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Congratulations to the winners of the inaugural Friends of the Wesleyan Library Undergraduate Research Prize!  The prize recognizes students who have used library resources creatively and productively to complete fascinating projects.

Criteria:

  • The research project, widely conceived, could be from any undergraduate course taken in Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, or Winter 2017 from currently enrolled Wesleyan students.
  • Honors theses were not eligible.
  • Projects were evaluated based on the use of Wesleyan’s library collections and resources as well as on the quality of writing and research.   The judges looked for evidence of learning about research techniques and the information-gathering process itself.

Rachel Rosenman (’17, Music and French) took first place with an essay titled “‘Mais la musique demeurera toujours’: Repurposing the French Baroque” (dir. Prof. Jane Alden).  The project’s aim was to produce modern adaptations of French Baroque viol music and to consider these new editions within important historical and theoretical contexts.

Rosenman

Second place went to Sara Feldman (’17, Anthropology and Dance), with a project titled “Hodu Lashem: Jewish Identities in India” (dir. Prof. Gina Athena Ulysse).  Her project was an ethnographic analysis examining peoplehood, nationalism, and identity formation through the lens of two distinct Jewish communities in India: the Bene Ephraim of Andhra Pradesh, India, and the Bene Israel of Mumbai, India.

Sara Feldman

 

An article about Rosenman and Feldman appeared in the Wesleyan Connection.  

A special thank you to this year’s judges: Dan Cherubin, Anthony Hatch, Kendall Hobbs, Diane Klare,  Michael Meere, and Meg Furniss Weisberg.

The winners were announced at the library’s National Library Week event on April 11, 2017.  The first place award was $500, and the second place award was $250.  If you would like to help sponsor next year’s awards, please email libfriends@wesleyan.edu.

 

Wesleyan students from the course FREN 325, “Museums, Objects and Empire,” are proud to present their exhibition “Uncovering Wesleyan’s Treasures.” This exhibition, using objects from the Archaeology and Anthropology collections and documents from Special Collections & Archives, presents the history of Wesleyan’s former museum, which occupied Judd Hall from 1871 to 1957. It also displays the students’ reflections on how to represent non-Western cultures and how to expose objects seen as “exotic” from a Western perspective.

This pop-up exhibition is open to the public on Monday, May 8th from 12 pm to 3:15 pm in the Davison Rare Book Room, Special Collections & Archives,  first floor Olin Library.

Two student-led tours will be organized, one at 1:00 pm in French and one at 1:40 pm in English.  Since space is limited, you may register for a tour in advance by emailing Professor Caroline Herbelin,  cherbelin@wesleyan.edu.

This exhibition is made possible by the help of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Special Collections & Archives, and the Archaeology and Anthropology Collections.

 

Wesleyan treasures medium

You are invited to a pop-up exhibition, “From Amate to Artists’ Books: Crafting Community through Media in Latin America,” organized by students in Corinna Zeltsman’s HIST321 course “Media and Power in Latin America,” with help from a team of campus collaborators. It brings together materials from Wesleyan’s Special Collections & Archives, general library collections, the Davison Art Center, and the Anthropology Collections. It will be held on May 4, 2017 from noon to 5:00 pm in the Davison Rare Book Room, first floor Olin Library.  Students will be giving gallery talks at noon and 4:30.  Come learn more about Wesleyan’s collections of Latin America-related materials!

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Crafting Communities medium

Speaking up for the Earth:

Artists’ books on the environment

An open house exhibit at
Special Collections & Archives

Time: Friday, April 14, 2017, 3:30-5:00 pm

Location: Davison Rare Book Room, Special Collections & Archives
1st floor Olin Memorial Library

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View artists’ books from Wesleyan’s collection inspired by the beauty of the earth and addressing pressing environmental issues.  The showcase will include several artists’ books made by students in E&ES197 Introduction to Environmental Studies.

All Your Reading Habits Belong To Us: Digital Privacy and our Government —Catching up with the Connecticut Four

 A discussion with Barbara Bailey and Peter Chase in honor of National Library Week

Wesleyan University’s Olin Memorial Library (252 Church St, Middletown, CT)
Tuesday, April 11th from 7-8:30pm in the Smith Reading Room with a reception to follow.

Chase and Bailey

The Friends of the Wesleyan Library are proud to present “All Your Reading Habits Belong To Us: Digital Privacy and our Government — Catching up with the Connecticut Four,” in honor of National Library Week.  In 2005, the FBI, under the auspices of the USA PATRIOT ACT, tried to access patron information from Connecticut libraries and issued a gag order on four  librarians, members of the executive committee of the CT Library Connection.  Known in the press as the Connecticut Four, the librarians spent over a year fighting the order and were successful in getting the FBI to withdraw.

Now, over a decade later, the Connecticut Four are speaking out against new efforts to expand the FBI’s ability to require libraries to hand over private information in the absence of a judge’s order.  Two members of the Connecticut Four, Barbara Bailey and Peter Chase, will join us for a discussion with Dan Cherubin, Wesleyan University Librarian, on the history of the case, what’s changed and, in regards to our newly elected government, what we need to watch.

Barbara Bailey is director of the Welles-Turner Memorial Library in Glastonbury, Connecticut.  She is a former president and current board member of the Library Connection, a non-profit cooperative of 30 public and academic libraries, which share an integrated library system (CONNECT) and other technological innovations.  Peter Chase was director of the Plainville (CT) Public Library from 1981-2015.  He was vice president of Library Connection in 2005 and is also the former chairman of the Connecticut Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee.  Both Barbara and Peter received the Paul Howard Award for Courage from the American Library Association in 2007, along with their colleagues Jan Nocek and George Christian.

The event will also feature the announcement of the winners of the Friends of the Wesleyan Library Undergraduate Research prize.  The candidate projects were evaluated based on the use of Wesleyan’s library collections and resources, evidence of learning about research techniques and the information-gathering process itself, and the quality of writing and research.

We take the opportunity of National Library Week to celebrate all libraries’ continued fight for both access of material and the right to privacy. As the American Library Association Code of Ethics, adopted in 1939, declares: “We protect each library user’s right to privacy and confidentiality with respect to information sought or received and resources consulted, borrowed, acquired or transmitted.”

This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, email libfriends@wesleyan.edu.

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poster sale 2017

Queer Past, Queer Future

A talk by alumni authors Jennifer Boylan ’80 and Alexander Chee ’89

Friday, March 3, 2017 — 5:00-6:30 pm

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Smith Reading Room, 1st floor Olin Memorial Library
252 Church Street, Middletown, CT 06459

Reception and book signing to follow

Alumni Jennifer Boylan ’80 and Alexander Chee ’89 read recent work, discuss queer lives and storytelling, and share their own experiences as LGBT writers at Wesleyan.
Jennifer Boylan, a professor at Barnard College, is the author of 15 books, including She’s Not There, the first bestselling work by a transgender American, and I’m Looking Through You, which contains a chapter on Wesleyan. She is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times and currently serves as the national co-chair of GLAAD, the media advocacy nonprofit for LGBTQ people. Her new novel, Long Black Veil, is forthcoming in April 2017.

Alexander Chee is the author of the novels The Queen of the Night and Edinburgh. He is a contributing editor at The New Republic, an editor at large at VQR and Lit Hub, and a critic at large for The Los Angeles Times. He is an associate professor of English at Dartmouth College.

The event is free and open to the public.
Sponsored by the Friends of the Wesleyan Library with support from Academic Affairs.

Email libfriends@wesleyan.edu for more information.

FoWL_stamp_gold reduced

 

The Friends of the Wesleyan Library are happy to announce the launch of an undergraduate research prize. The research project, widely conceived, can be from any undergraduate course taken in Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, or Winter 2017 from currently enrolled Wesleyan students. Honors theses are not eligible.

Projects will be evaluated based on the use of Wesleyan’s library collections and resources as well as on the quality of writing and research. We are particularly interested in receiving applications that show evidence of learning about research techniques and the information-gathering process itself.

There will be two cash awards: a 1st-place prize worth $500 and a 2nd-place prize worth $250.

Instructors and librarians are encouraged to nominate students’ work; students may also self-nominate. Please send nominations to: libfriends@wesleyan.edu.

All materials must be submitted electronically, preferably as PDF files. Applications will include:

The jury will be comprised of members of the Friends of Wesleyan Library board, Wesleyan librarians, and Wesleyan faculty from Arts & Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences, and Natural Sciences & Mathematics.

Deadline: 5pm, March 10, 2017.

Awards will be announced in April 2017.

For inquiries, contact the Friends of Wesleyan Library, at libfriends@wesleyan.edu.

 

ArtFarm, a Middletown theater organization which produces an annual summer Shakespeare festival among other programs, asked the library to assist with a community-based theater project, Where Are We Now? Race, Pride, Class and Inequity.  They are placing books in various community spaces to invite people to write about their experiences of discrimination or hopes, dreams, vision and suggested solutions for creating an equitable community.  The Wesleyan book is on a table in Olin Lobby through March 3, 2017.  Some of the stories collected may be featured in wall art or be included in a performance on April 7, 2017 at Oddfellows Playhouse.

 

Guerilla#2.StoryShare Equity.Hope

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On Friday, January 27, 2017, Associate Professor of Music Paula Matthusen and Visiting Scholar in Music Terri Hron performed Hidden Volumes, “an exploration and remembrance of space through magnetic, transferred traces” in Olin Library.  “Looping backwards and forwards, distorting time,” they improvised on a series of recordings originally made in a dark Roman aqueduct which had been transferred onto reel-to-reel tape (the loops of magnetic traces).  The performers stationed themselves in the central book stacks on the third floor, but the music could be heard throughout many floors of the library.  The audience explored the soundscape by moving through the space — and enjoyed browsing the nearby books.  Afterwards, Paula explained some of the technical aspects of the composition.

 

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